ISP’s confirm ‘2012: The Year The Internet Ends’

Fight to save the Internet from becoming just another Pay-Per-View TV experience!

Read the entire article from ‘I Power’ HERE.

Oklahoma’s Charles Key Vows to Continue the Sovereignty Fight

In a follow-up to the article “Oklahoma Declares Sovereignty,” I located a piece from World Net Daily that addresses some questions regarding the reason behind HJR 1089, such as the one that Kooch posted to this site yesterday:

It only looks like they are preparing to do something the central government says they can’t do. This could be related to a divisive issue like abortion, gay marriage, etc. Or it could be about business.

Well Kooch, you were right. The impetus for this  was due to the Fed’s heavy handed intrusion into Oklahoma’s stance on illegal immigration:

The Sooner State became a hotbed of federal vs. state authority clashes earlier this month when a federal judge blocked a portion of Oklahoma’s tough immigration laws, ruling that plaintiffs would likely establish that the state mandates preempted federal immigration laws.

Oklahoma’s immigration statute, known as the Oklahoma Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2007, originated as House Bill 1804 (co-authored, incidentally, by Key). It has been characterized by USA Today as “arguably the nation’s toughest state law targeting illegal immigration.”

The statute prohibits illegal immigrants from receiving tax-supported services and makes it a state crime to transport or harbor illegal immigrants. It also mandates that businesses take measures to verify the work eligibility of employees and independent contractors.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and individual chambers of commerce in Oklahoma challenged the latter mandates, set to go into effect July 1, in court.

On June 4th, U.S. District Judge Robin J. Cauthron issued an injunction against enforcing the July 1 mandates.

“We’ve just had a federal judge say that our immigration law’s employer provisions are unconstitutional, claiming it as federal government territory,” said Key in response. “That goes right to the issue of (Resolution 1089). The federal government doesn’t have the right to have sole domain over that issue or many of the issues it has spilled over into.”

The bill is also languishing in dormancy in the Rules Committee, as pointed out by Oldphart and Enlighten:

Though House Joint Resolution 1089 received great support in Oklahoma’s House of Representatives, it has now hit a roadblock. In the state’s Senate, where the seats are split, 24-24, between Republicans and Democrats, the resolution was sent to the Senate’s rules committee, where it languished without action until the legislature adjourned.

According to Key, the Senate has worked out agreements on how to manage the political tie, including power given to the Democratic senators to not hear certain bills. Those senators, says Key, refuse to even hear Resolution 1089.

In the House, where Republicans enjoy a 57-44 majority, Resolution 1089 received a hearing and was supported overwhelmingly on both sides of the aisle.

“I was on the Democratic side of the floor,” said Key, “and one member went off talking about how far we’ve gotten, how bad (federal overreaches of power) are getting – it’s the kind of thing you hear in coffee shops.”

We shouldn’t give up hope however, as State Representative Charles Key vows to continue the fight:

Key said his bill “is making a difference” in the way legislators in Oklahoma are talking and thinking about state’s rights. “I think it will make even more of a difference,” he said, “when I bring it up again.” He vows to put the pressure on Oklahoma’s Senate to pass a resolution like 1089, and he plans to begin communicating the cause with legislators around the country, urging them to bring up the issue in their states.

Key passed a similar resolution in 1994, when he was serving a previous tenure in the legislature. But that attempt was only a House resolution. He authored 1089 as a joint resolution because, he said, he wanted to increase its exposure. “As people who believe in this constitutional form of government,” he said, “we need to bring this issue to a national level and debate.” (World Net Daily) LINK

Barb

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